Lady Smatter's Salon

Georgian and Regency Art and Inspiration for Accomplished Young Persons.

seetheconqueringherocomes:

Lieutenant-General The Rt. Honourable Sir Arthur Wellesley, KB, a miniature painted in watercolours on ivory by Richard Cosway, c.1808 (Note the crimson riband denoting his status as being a Knight Companion of the Order of the Bath)


I’d recognize that nose anywhere!

seetheconqueringherocomes:

Lieutenant-General The Rt. Honourable Sir Arthur Wellesley, KB, a miniature painted in watercolours on ivory by Richard Cosway, c.1808 (Note the crimson riband denoting his status as being a Knight Companion of the Order of the Bath)

I’d recognize that nose anywhere!

(via lesleyannemcleod)

design-is-fine:

Ann & Peter Bateman, teapot, 1798-99. Silver, wood. England. Cooper Hewitt


This is just so elegant!

design-is-fine:

Ann & Peter Bateman, teapot, 1798-99. Silver, wood. England. Cooper Hewitt

This is just so elegant!

(via 18thcenturylove)

mademoisellelapiquante:

Northanger Abbey - 2007

mademoisellelapiquante:

Northanger Abbey - 2007

(via tudor-girls)

history-of-fashion:

1806 Thomas Phillips - William Blathwayt IV and His Wife, Frances Scott, out Walking

These two seem like characters in an Austen novel!

history-of-fashion:

1806 Thomas Phillips - William Blathwayt IV and His Wife, Frances Scott, out Walking

These two seem like characters in an Austen novel!

(via bacchitempel)

smithsonianlibraries:

A diagram of the movement of the Moon around the Earth (seen here) and a recipe for invisible ink await you in Mary Smith’s Commonplace Book. Help us make Mary’s journal of scientific inquiry more accessible by becoming a digital volunteer at the Smithsonian Transcription Center.

This is SO COOL! Mary Smith must have been a very accomplished lady. Rather than copying out poetry, riddles, or moral maxims in her commonplace book, she kept notes about science and mathematics! From the Smithsonian’s page:

Mary Smith’s Commonplace Book Concerning Science and Mathematics is a two volume hand-written manuscript, which dates from around 1769-1780. The manuscript is a remarkable collection of personal writings and summaries of articles concerning everything form science and math to medicine and religion.

smithsonianlibraries:

A diagram of the movement of the Moon around the Earth (seen here) and a recipe for invisible ink await you in Mary Smith’s Commonplace Book. Help us make Mary’s journal of scientific inquiry more accessible by becoming a digital volunteer at the Smithsonian Transcription Center.

This is SO COOL! Mary Smith must have been a very accomplished lady. Rather than copying out poetry, riddles, or moral maxims in her commonplace book, she kept notes about science and mathematics! From the Smithsonian’s page:

Mary Smith’s Commonplace Book Concerning Science and Mathematics is a two volume hand-written manuscript, which dates from around 1769-1780. The manuscript is a remarkable collection of personal writings and summaries of articles concerning everything form science and math to medicine and religion.

(via maryrobinette)

georgianstyle:

L’Atelier d’une jeune artiste, by Louis-Léopold Boilly (French, 1761-1845) 

Such an accomplished young lady!

georgianstyle:

L’Atelier d’une jeune artiste, by Louis-Léopold Boilly (French, 1761-1845) 

Such an accomplished young lady!

books0977:

A Young Painter and His Model (c.1788-1792). Louis Léopold Boilly (French, 1761-1845). Oil on canvas. Smith College Museum of Art.
The model is placed in a provocative context, framed between the painting of a boudoir seduction and a sculpture by Falconet of the “Sleeping Bacchante” on the table next to her. This flirtatious scene is set within the more general subject of the artist in his studio. Visible are the artist’s tools as well as references to visual art: painting, sculpture, drawing, textile design, and architecture.

Louis Léopold Boilly is rapidly becoming a favorite around here!

books0977:

A Young Painter and His Model (c.1788-1792). Louis Léopold Boilly (French, 1761-1845). Oil on canvas. Smith College Museum of Art.

The model is placed in a provocative context, framed between the painting of a boudoir seduction and a sculpture by Falconet of the “Sleeping Bacchante” on the table next to her. This flirtatious scene is set within the more general subject of the artist in his studio. Visible are the artist’s tools as well as references to visual art: painting, sculpture, drawing, textile design, and architecture.

Louis Léopold Boilly is rapidly becoming a favorite around here!

lindahall:

Thomas Bewick - Scientist of the Day

Thomas Bewick, an English artist and print maker, was born Aug. 12, 1753. Bewick pioneered the illustrating technique known as wood engraving, where the artist works on the end grain of a block of wood, instead of the side grain, and uses the burin of the engraver, rather than the knife of the woodcutter, to carve the block. Wood engravings are usually small and detailed, and have the advantage of being able to be printed right along with the type, instead of on a separate press. Bewick specialized in creating prints of mammals and birds; his A General History of Quadrupeds was published in 1790, and A History of British Birds in 1797-1804, and both are filled with exceptionally high-quality images. We see several samples above: a hoopoe, and a woodlark. Remember, if you are viewing these on a large screen, that the original woodblock’s are only about 3” by 2” in size.

One other charming feature of Bewick’s books are the tailpieces that were often added to the open spaces at the end of articles and chapters. We see above Bewick’s tiny engraving of Aesop’s fable of the raven and the pitcher.

We displayed the 1809 edition of Bewick’s History of British Birds in our 2009 exhibition, The Grandeur of Life, where you may see two more of his wood engravings, a barn owl and a kingfisher. We have since acquired the 1797-1804 first edition of this work for our History of Science Collection.

Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City

Paintings in Detail - Cravats part eleven

I love a good cravat!

(via bacchitempel)

books0977:

Reading to the Convalescent (c.1827). Jean-Augustin Franquelin (French, 1798-1839). Oil on canvas. The Clark Art Institute.
In this tender scene, a young couple, presumably husband and wife, sit together in a well-appointed room. Pale and weak, the woman holds the man’s hand and leans against his shoulder as he reads aloud. The third figure, perhaps the ailing woman’s mother, also listens attentively to the reading. Franquelin specialized in such scenes of domestic life, which often hint at a moral message.

So many sweet details in this scene!

books0977:

Reading to the Convalescent (c.1827). Jean-Augustin Franquelin (French, 1798-1839). Oil on canvas. The Clark Art Institute.

In this tender scene, a young couple, presumably husband and wife, sit together in a well-appointed room. Pale and weak, the woman holds the man’s hand and leans against his shoulder as he reads aloud. The third figure, perhaps the ailing woman’s mother, also listens attentively to the reading. Franquelin specialized in such scenes of domestic life, which often hint at a moral message.

So many sweet details in this scene!